Kids 'n Kinship
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2018 Kids 'n Kinship Annual Gala

Join us at the Gala: Sunday, September 30, 2018
4:30 to 7:30 pm @ Brackett's Crossing, Lakeville

Buy your tickets for only $50 each. View the flier.
Sponsor the Gala or donate an item to the Silent Auction, Beer or Wine Pull. Suggested Silent Auction Baskets. Contact Jan at 952-892-6368 or jbkinship@aol.com
The 2018 Kids 'n Kinship Annual Gala has something for everyone!

  • From the terrace to the ballroom, Brackett's Crossing offers a first-class evening for all to enjoy
  • Enjoy a wonderful evening with mouth-watering cuisine prepared by an award-winning chef
  • Enjoy great entertainment
  • Participate in our popular Silent Auction - a variety of attractive, fun, and useful items
  • Pick up great deals at our popular Wine Cork Pull and Craft Beer Pull in time for the holidays
  • The highlight of the evening: a mentor match testimonial that will touch your heart
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Kids 'n Kinship
14870 Granada Avenue #127
Apple Valley MN, 55124
952-892-6368
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Proud user of Innovative Mentoring for managing our program data.
Medical Monkeys
Funds received from the purchase of the Medical Monkeys goes towards finding mentors for our waiting youth.

Acknowledgments

Media Relations

Kids 'n Kinship would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Media Relations for their ongoing support in promotion and publicity of our program.


Thank you donors!

This Quarter's Donors

Match highlight Winter 2018 Deena and Talia

It is 5 year anniversary time for this wonderful match! "Over the years, I have watched her grow from a silly, fun loving young girl into a caring, responsible teenager." Says Deena

The match began in January 2013 through our school based mentor program. Deena visited Talia in her third grade classroom every Friday. They would occasionally read, work on a journal, play a game or visit the media center. Now that Talia is older, they get together outside of school and enjoy games and watching movies and in warmer weather, they do outdoor activities like bike riding, going to parks, and having water balloon fights. One of the things Deena says she enjoyed the most was making gifts with Talia for Talia's friends and family for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, birthdays, and Christmas.

"The match is going great after all these years. The ladies still get together on Fridays during the school year and on summer break. They cook/bake and do crafts together...among other things. Talia is excited to get to know Deena’s grandchildren." Says Talia's mom

Talia has become part of Deena's family, spending time with Deena and her husband, their children and grandchildren and helping with garage sales. And speaking of sales: Last summer Deena and Talia started collecting grocery store receipts. The receipts are from any Spartan Nash store through a program called Direct Your Dollars. Local Spartan Nash stores include Family Fresh in Farmington and Econofoods in Northfield. People mail their receipts in; Deena and Talia collect and organize them. They just accumulated $150,000 in receipts earning $1000 to support mentor matches in Kids 'n Kinship! Way to go ladies!!!

Mentor like a SUPERSTAR

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

All of you who mentor are SUPERSTARS!  

A mentor is a torch who helps kids see into their futures. - Julie Connor, Ed.D. 





10 Tips to Mentor Like a Superstar
Teens are starving for attention from an adult who believes in them.
A  teen who doesn’t have a healthy relationship with an adult often lacks confidence. They are less likely to develop communication and social skills needed to establish strong personal boundaries because no one is available to be a role model. They have no one to turn to for guidance when they’re suffering and need to talk.
Teens who lack the presence of a significant adult in their lives are targeted for bullying more often than peers who have strong adult support. Many teens find support they crave through participation in gangs. They are 80 percent more likely to struggle with depression and six times more likely to attempt suicide (NCBI, 2013). 
The good news is this: Our kids don’t have to drown in silent desperation. Youth motivational speaker, Josh Shipp, believes, “Every kid is ONE caring adult away from being a success story.” A mentor is a torch who helps kids see into their futures. Mentoring offers emotional support, guidance, and encouragement for lonely youth. 
A mentor is a torch who helps kids see into their futures. - Julie Connor, Ed.D.Click To TweetYouth mentoring is a process of matching young people with a caring adult. Adult mentors are usually unrelated to the child or teen and work as volunteers through community-, school-, or church-based programs.
Training is essential to the mentor preparation process. Not every volunteer possesses the qualities, emotional stability, or skills to be a mentor. The most successful mentoring programs interview potential mentors and offer mentor training. They consistently check in with mentors and mentees to monitor progress and track feedback.
The Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities series provide mentoring program coordinators and mentors with tools to build quality mentoring programs. They outlined 10 tips for adults who want to be successful youth mentors:

  1. Build relationships grounded in trust. Many teens without mature role models are suspicious of adults. Do not try to become your mentee’s best friend or substitute parent. Mentors are positive role models who invite open communication and mutual respect.
  2. Create realistic goals and expectations. Do not expect your mentee to confide in you right away. Ask questions; get to know your mentee. As your relationship grows, your mentee will feel more comfortable sharing his or her life with you. 
  3. Have fun together. Find out what kind of activities your mentee enjoys. Go bowling or watch a good movie. Shoot some hoops. Play miniature golf. Walk through a mall or grab a snack at a food bar. You need not spend a lot of money to build a strong mentor/mentee relationship; what’s most valuable is your investment of time. Need more ideas? Try one of these suggestions from 100 Ideas to Use When Mentoring Youth.
  4. Discuss decisions about activities with your mentee. Some teens may be shy to suggest ideas because they don’t want to appear rude or needy. Others are content to let you make the decisions, especially in the beginning stages of your relationship. When you ask your mentee for input, this shows you value his or her ideas.
  5. Allow your mentee to reveal personal information when they are ready. Give your mentee permission to reveal how much (or how little) information they wish to share with you. Remind them that they can share with you without fear of judgement.
  6. Listen. When you ask questions and listen, you give mentees permission to share their stories and personal experiences without criticism. Ask one of these questions if you are not sure how to launch a conversation with your mentee.
  7. If a mentee asks for advice, focus on solutions. Allow your mentee time to release uncomfortable emotions if they need to vent, but encourage him or her to consider their options. When they focus less on what they can’t control and shift their attention to those areas within their control: including their own thoughts, feelings, decisions, and actions, they reclaim their personal power. Don’t get stuck in the problem; consider solutions. 
  8. Be positive. Briefly share your own experiences to demonstrate empathy, but your time together is not about you – it’s about your mentee. Do not bog down your time or monopolize conversations with stories about your struggles when you were growing up. If your mentee feels “stuck,” remind him or her they can change their perspective by changing their thoughts.
  9. Your primary relationship is with your mentee, not their parents or family members. Do not try to act as an intermediary between your mentee and family. Resist efforts as a mentor to be drawn into parental or familial issues. Discuss matters of concern with your program director.
  10. It is your responsibility to set a good example as a mentor. Your mentee will lose trust in you if you can’t be depended upon to honor your commitments. Decide upon consistent times to talk or meet with your mentee. Show up on time. Your lack of commitment can be devastating for the young person you offered to support. If you are unsure about the time or emotional commitment you have to share with a child or teen, do not volunteer to be a mentor until you are confident you can fulfill the responsibilities.
Want to read the rest of the article?
https://www.drjulieconnor.com/10-mentoring-tips/

Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota

Kids 'n Kinship has achieved Expert Partner status through Mentoring Partnership Minnesota's Quality Mentoring Assesment Path (QMAP) and has a 100% overall implementation rating on an extensive list of best practices and quality standards for mentoring programs. We are 1 of only 9 other programs to earn this distinguished rating under these rigorous guidelines.